For Valentine’s Day: “Invisible Cabinets: A Glimpse into the Morbid Anatomy Museum ‘Gentlemen’s Erotica’ Section,” a guest post by Laetitia Barbier. She writes:

"As a Parisian student, I was fascinated with the idea that our National Library once conserved its most licentious material in a reclused section conveniently named “The Hell.” Confiscated over the centuries by the French authorities, piles of erotic publications and other unchaste artifacts were gathered on the shelves of the storage room, labeled “ENFER” and cast away from general public appreciation. Stored aside to prevent “ moral contamination” and only visible to a few scholars under very strict conditions, the censored hoard flourished to become a secret yet abundant collection. “L’enfer” was the academic repository of mankind’s most untamed fantasies…"

Read the full piece (and see more images) by clicking here: http://morbidanatomy.blogspot.com/2014/02/invisible-cabinets-glimpse-into-morbid.html

"A Skeleton as a Woman Warning of the Dangers of Fornication"
Oil on Canvas, French or Spanish School, c.1680

“A Skeleton as a Woman Warning of the Dangers of Fornication”
French or Spanish School, c.1680
Oil on canvas , 174 x 73 cm

From Wellcome Images.

Dead effigy of Prince Maurice of Saxe-Zeitz (1652-1653) The portrait shows the seven moths old second-born Prince Maurice after his death. Oil on canvas, circa 1653.

Via Museum Schloss Moritzburg Zeitz

More here: http://www.museum-digital.de/san/index.php?t=objekt&oges=945

Hair Art! Frederik Ruysch Inspired Wet Specimen Workshop! Valentine’s Week Spectacles! Body Snatching! This Week and beyond at the Morbid Anatomy Museum

Full listing of upcoming events here: http://morbidanatomy.blogspot.com/2014/02/hair-art-frederik-ruysch-inspired-wet.html

Hair Art! Frederik Ruysch Inspired Wet Specimen Workshop! Valentine’s Week Spectacles! Body Snatching! This Week and beyond at the Morbid Anatomy Museum

Full listing of upcoming events here: http://morbidanatomy.blogspot.com/2014/02/hair-art-frederik-ruysch-inspired-wet.html

New Morbid Anatomy Museum events just announced: Baltimore field trip with special tour of Nutshell Studies of Unexplained Death and tour guide Robert Marbury! Barcelona, Spain Carnival Week Congress for Curious Peoples! And. DJ Blake Schwarzenbach added to Morbid Anatomy singles event!

Full info on all here: Hope to see you at one or more!
http://morbidanatomy.blogspot.com/2014/01/baltimore-field-trip-dark-arts-in-dark.html

V0042231 A young man and a young woman looking thr Copyrighted work available under Creative Commons

Via Wellcome Images

V0042231 A young man and a young woman looking thr Copyrighted work available under Creative Commons

Via Wellcome Images

V0017612 Life and death. Oil painting. Copyrighted work available under Creative Commons.

Via Wellcome Images

Ivory Memento Mori-Themed Rosary, Circa 1500-1525, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York:

Rosary, ca. 1500–1525
German
Ivory, silver, partially gilded mounts
Overall: 24 11/16 x 2 1/8 x 1 3/4 in. (62.7 x 5.4 x 4.5 cm) Gift of J. Pierpont Morgan, 1917 (17.190.306)

Each bead of the rosary represents the bust of a well-fed burgher or maiden on one side, and a skeleton on the other. The terminals, even more graphically, show the head of a deceased man, with half the image eaten away from decay. Such images served as reminders that life is fleeting and that leading a virtuous life as a faithful Christian is key to salvation.

You can find out more about this wonderful object by clicking here: http://morbidanatomy.blogspot.com/2014/01/ivory-memento-mori-themed-rosary-circa.html

Offertory Box (Collecting Box) for Gravediggers, Painted Wood, 18th Century; found on the Birmingham Museums and Art Gallery website; text explains: 

This is a rare surviving example of a collecting box for gravediggers. It probably dates from the 18th century and is made from an unidentified hardwood, which has been painted, with a skull and crossbones. The church and the people working for the parish relied heavily on donations of money to boost their meagre earnings. 

More information—and additional views—can be found here: http://www.bmagic.org.uk/objects/1965T5325.

Offertory Box (Collecting Box) for Gravediggers, Painted Wood, 18th Century; found on the Birmingham Museums and Art Gallery website; text explains:

This is a rare surviving example of a collecting box for gravediggers. It probably dates from the 18th century and is made from an unidentified hardwood, which has been painted, with a skull and crossbones. The church and the people working for the parish relied heavily on donations of money to boost their meagre earnings.

More information—and additional views—can be found here: http://www.bmagic.org.uk/objects/1965T5325.